gout-care-gout-help-gout-attacks-gout-health-gout-pain-doctors
Alternative Health Research LLC

Gout Care By Smith & Smith Est.1998


   




Order 24 hours a day 7 days a week online or by phone!
Call 1-877-633-4688

cart
Customer Reviews








FDA

gout-help-gout-products-gout-care-good-manufacturing-practice

What is GMP Click Here?
Kevin Eric Smith ,
+1-877-633-4688
U.S.A
doctor-group


Gout Increases Risk Of Heart Attack

 

 

 

Welcome to Gout-Care-We-Care

by Smith & Smith Enterprises

Our goal is to bring you the latest in important information regarding your joint health.  We thank you for joining us and hope that you take the time to enjoy the information we have to share with you as well as our delicious recipes that show you just how you can have your steak and eat it too!  Please be sure to contact us should you have any questions at all!  Contact and site information can be found below.  Thank You!
    getresponse    
      
News and Information


Gout Increases Risk Of Heart Attack, According To Study

ScienceDaily (Aug. 2, 2006) - People with gout are at increased risk of having a heart attack, according to a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine study published in the August edition of the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism. This is the first study to show that among men with no previous history of coronary artery disease, gout is a significant independent risk factor of heart attack.

Gout is a metabolic disease marked by acute arthritis and inflammation of the joints, usually beginning in the knee or foot. It is caused by hyperuricemia, a build up of uric acid in blood. When chronic or severe hyperuricemia leads to urate crystals within joints, it results in an inflammatory response that manifests as gouty arthritis.

"Our study confirms that gouty arthritis is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI) or heart attack. Until now this relationship has not been explained by well-known links to renal function, metabolic syndrome, diuretic use and the traditional cardiovascular risk factors," said Eswar Krishnan, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, division of rheumatology, and principal author of the study.

The prospective study examined data from 12,866 men who were enrolled for a mean of 6.5 years in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT), a randomized primary cardiovascular disease prevention trial conducted and supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

There were 5,337 men with hyperuricemia at the beginning of the study. Over the study period, 1,123 individuals developed gouty arthritis. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with regard to cholesterol levels, aspirin use, family history of acute MI, or diabetes mellitus. However, the group with gout was significantly more likely to have used diuretics and alcohol. Modest yet statistically significant elevations of blood pressure, age, blood glucose and body mass index were observed in the gout group. Subjects in the group with gout were less likely to be current smokers than were those in the group without gout.

During the course of the study, 1,108 events of acute MI occurred in the group with gout (10.5 percent) and 990 events in the group without gout (8.43 percent). Of the 1,108 MIs, 246 were fatal.

The study also found a relationship between gout and the risk of acute MI to be present among nonusers of alcohol, diuretics or aspirin and among those who did not have metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus or obesity.

"The absolute magnitude of the relative risk for the presence of gout was not high. Yet, the odds ratio associated with gout was relatively high compared to other risk factors in this study," Dr. Krishnan said. "For acute MI to occur, an environment that promotes atherogenesis and thrombogenesis is needed. Hyperuricemia is well known to be an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic diseases in general and since chronic hyperuricemia is strongly associated with gout, it is not very surprising that an independent coronary risk for the presence of both hyperuricemia and gout was observed."

This study was supported by an unrestricted grant from TAP Pharmaceutical Products Inc. of Lake Forest, Il. This was an investigator-initiated project, and TAP Pharmaceutical Products Inc. was not involved in the design, data collection, or analysis and interpretation of the data.

Story Source:

The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.
 

Recipe

 

Seared Tuna & Watercress with Scallion-Ginger Relish (2 servings)

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon of fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, divided
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced scallions
  • 1/2 cup drained, canned water chestnuts, diced (see Tips for Two)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted (see Tip)
  • 1 8-ounce tuna steak, about 1-inch thick
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh organic real unsalted butter
  • 1/8 teaspoon Pure Himalayan Salt
  • 4 cups watercress, washed and trimmed (about 1 bunch)

Preparation

  1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat.
  2. Combine orange juice, soy sauce, sesame oil, ginger, hot sauce and 1/8 teaspoon pepper in a large bowl. Transfer half the dressing to a small bowl; add scallions, water chestnuts and sesame seeds, and toss.
  3. Rub tuna with lemon butter mixed and sprinkle with salt and the remaining 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Grill until the fish is opaque, 4 to 5 minutes per side.
  4. Add watercress to the large bowl and toss to coat with the remaining dressing. Cut the tuna into 2 portions. Divide the watercress between 2 plates and top with the tuna and scallion-ginger relish.

Tips & Notes

  • Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step 2, cover and refrigerate for up to 6 hours.
  • Tips for Two: Store leftover water chestnuts in the refrigerator, covered with water; they keep for up to 1 month with daily water changes. Add to a stir-fry; toss in a green salad; jazz up chicken or tuna salad; Asian Brown Rice.
  • Tip: To toast sesame seeds, heat a small dry skillet over low heat. Add sesame seeds and stir constantly until golden and fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and let cool.

 

 
Goutcure.com Commentary

 

For more information, see links below:




getresponse 

 

Contact Us

Smith & Smith Enterprises

        www.goutcure.com           

168 W Main Street Unit 370
New Market, MD 21774

getresponse

Phone: 1-877-633-4688

Email: customerservice@goutcare.com

Fax: 1-877-686-6762

getresponse

 







Order online 100% securely ~ All your information will be encrypted with 128 bit encryption (high) RSA with 1024 bit exchange.
*The products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, and they are not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease.


We accept Mastercard, Visa, PayPal, and American Express. Copyright 1998-2024 Goutcure.com / Goutcare.com / OrderGC.com / Stopgout.com / Gout-Care.com / AHR4Health.com.
Alternative Health Research LLC T/A Smith and Smith Enterprises 11941 Main St. - Unit 130, Libertytown, MD 21762-1100 . All Rights Reserved.

Privacy Policy



All Products Page
Yahoo and Shopper Approved Testimonials
Privacy Policy
Question and Answers About Gout Care
Order Forms
24 Hour Order Desk
World Wide Distributors
Join Our NewsLetter
Company and Shipping Information







*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.